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  • Need ideas for custom platform drum

    I'm looking to build a custom drum to replace my factory 2" drum on my CA-53 Valor speed bag platform. I want it to look really cool and have great rebound qualities. It's got to be thick...around 5 inches...and about 28" diameter. I could make a low cost one from 2x6" fir wall studs...but since this wood is soft, I don't think the rebound will be that good. The other choices would be maple, oak or poplar. Weight for a 5"x28"diameter hardwood drum would be about 70-80lbs. The CA-53 platform is really well designed and can take the additional load...
    What would your ideal platform look like?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    If you plan to do any old school style bagging, you might want a slightly larger diameter drum. The photos show an old school bag on a 24" platform.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Awesome pics, Paranday.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by kenk View Post
        I'm looking to build a custom drum to replace my factory 2" drum on my CA-53 Valor speed bag platform. I want it to look really cool and have great rebound qualities. It's got to be thick...around 5 inches...and about 28" diameter. I could make a low cost one from 2x6" fir wall studs...but since this wood is soft, I don't think the rebound will be that good. The other choices would be maple, oak or poplar. Weight for a 5"x28"diameter hardwood drum would be about 70-80lbs. The CA-53 platform is really well designed and can take the additional load...
        What would your ideal platform look like?
        After of about a 2 month of researching, and one trial and error, here is what I am planning on doing. The reason I'm kinda obsessing over trying to find or make the pefect, vibration/noise free set-up, is because when I used to live in a cottage by myself, I didnt have to worry about the noise or shaking, but now I live underneath people and need to try and find the quitest set-up possible or otherwise give up hitting the speedbag . So, I think I'm going to either buy the Valor Ca-53 or the Primefighter 400. To it I want to mount one of the following three maple butcher blocks. Oh and KENK, I will also be planning on trying your rubber coaster method that you described, when mounting the frame to the wall. Im looking forward to pics/video of your method in action. I'm trying to incorporate any and all strategies that may eliminate noise/vibration.

        A 24 inch round and 4 inches thick, Boos Maple Butcher Block, 53 lbs., $279 http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/...r/p347549.aspx

        A 24x24 and 6 inches thick, Boos Maple Butcher Block,96 lbs, $419 I'm leaning towards this one, first line in the add says "Go Big or Go Home"
        http://www.kitchenislandco.com/jo-bb...ing-block.html

        A 24x25 and 7 inches thick, Boos Maple Counter Top 117lbs, $649 http://butcherblockco.com/product/ma...d-grain-7thick

        The thickest round block only goes up to 4 inches, then the 6-7 inches are squared. I'm not sure what, if any benifit the board being round may be? I was hoping to get some feedback on that as well. Is it just appearance, or does the shape have some other effect? These are just the ones I looked at, and like Paranday said, if your going to do old school style bagging, you will want to go bigger on the diameters, which is also available, at increased prices.

        But because these Butcher blocks are so heavy, I was leaning more towards the Primefighter 400, because it claims to be designed to hold a heavy bag as well, and heavy bags themselves are 100 lbs+, plus hitting the heavy bag adds more stress and weight, so I was assuming that may be the better choice for the custom board. Here are some pics and links of the Butcher Blocks/Counter tops. The Boos Blocks claim to be Solid Hard Rock Maple, but I haven't found any links/ threads that other members have either seen or used this product, to get a first hand analyses of it in action. There was one thread, I can't locate it, but Mayweather was using a Round Butcher Block, is what it appeared to be. hopefully some other maybe can weigh in on this idea. It would really suck if it didn't pan out and perform well, and then get stuck with a 100lb butcher block, with 4 holes drilled in it.

        This is the part that concerns me about the Boos Blocks,is that it is made by "endgrain", not sure if this is ideal, alsp where it claims to ABSORB the impact of the blade. I'm not sure if we want any type of absorption? Here what it says: "They are made from the finest Northern Hard Rock Maple - known for its fine, close grain - and feature end-grain construction. End grain butcher block tops are made by standing short pieces of wood side by side in a checkerboard pattern, bonding them together with adhesives, then subjecting them to heat and enormous pressure. The end-grain work surface has important advantages besides its intricate design. For instance, during cutting or chopping, the end grain wood fibers better absorb the impact of knife blades, keeping them sharper longer. Also, the malleable and forgiving end grain surface is more resistant to nicks and gouges, which prevents bacteria from entering the wood, keeps the board looking new longer, and increases its longevity.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Bag-A-Holic; 12-30-2012, 01:15 PM. Reason: more info
        -Anthony

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        • #5
          antny72...I've called several butcher block manufacturers, and they will make your drum whatever diameter, thickness, grain direction and material you want. End grain butcher block really looks cool. The compressive strength for end grain maple is about 5-8 times higher than the strength at right angles to the grain. I think this means faster rebounds. My only concern would be strength issues when the bag hits the drum. It would put the block in tension on one side which could result in a crack. The thicker the block, the lower the tensile stress, and the less likelihood of a crack. If you still wanted to use end grain maple, you could reinforce the back with a 3/8" steel plate, just like the they did on the first rate boxing platform. I got a quote from a metal work company of $240 for 24"dia by 3/8" thick steel...it would weigh about 40lbs too. I would suggest that if you wanted less rebound, go for a larger diameter platform too. That's the main reason that I'm thinking of 28" diameter...
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Kenk,
            Yeah I actually looked into the First Rate for a while and was pretty much set on buying, but they were back ordered 6 weeks, and just recently look into it much more, and in addition to the wait, I came across a couple of things that I was ablle to discuss with another forum member that actually owns a First rate platform, that made me not feel so comfortable about it anymore, and that it may not of been my best choice.

            So for end grain, if its 6 inches thick, you would still suggest a reinforced plate too?

            I was thinking that the purpose of the first rate bottom plate design, was to distribute the weight of the impact of the bag evenly. But thought after a certain thickness of wood, that the need for that would be minimized or not needed at all. What that thickness would be, I have no clue, but was hoping 6 inches would cover it.

            Also if necessary, do you think this reinforcing plate you speak of can be attached to the two horizontal support arms of the actual platform instead (if the actual platform had two support arms), and be just as effective or maybe more, as oppose to mounting it to the wooden drum itself? (kinda like the first rate, the metal is an extention of the support arm, and then it attaches to the wooden drum) Also if reinforcing the wood itself would glueing the metal on be better than screwing it on? I'm thinking if this endgrain block is already glued together, the less things are screwed into it, the less the strength of the block will be compromised or weakened?

            lol, gosh this is getting very complicated and expensive with no guarantees either!!!! This is why I'm procratinating a bit and not jumping into this right away.

            I was also thinking about putting several coats of like a clear laquer on it so it would be stronger and have a thick glass like surface. What are some thoughts about that? Would that work as a strong reinforcement, holding it all together?

            Originally posted by kenk View Post
            I would suggest that if you wanted less rebound, go for a larger diameter platform too. That's the main reason that I'm thinking of 28" diameter...
            Now when you mention "if you want less rebound, go for a larger diameter platform", can you or anyone please elaborate on this further. Does this have anything to do with being round or square as well? Meaning if there is added surface area on a square as oppose to a circle, it will rebound less. And does rebound less correlate with vibrate more? Now does this less of a rebound also factor in noise? Meaning that does it make less noise or more noise, if the rebound is lessened? See i originally thought the bigger and heavier the drum the less vibration, but recently bought and returned a 30 inch diameter with 1 3/4 thick drum platform set-up, that although it was a large diameter, to my surprise, it had so much vibration. (the board was only 30 lbs though) It actually made more noise and vibration than the 24" everlast standard ~1 inch, pressboard I had.) So this is the point where I started to think, it needs to be thick and heavy and not so much a wide diameter, unless needed to make sure a larger speedbag has enough room. I'm thinking the wider it is, proportionally, the thicker it also needs to be as well, maybe more?

            Just some thoughts and ideas to bounce around the forum!!!
            Last edited by Bag-A-Holic; 12-31-2012, 09:14 AM.
            -Anthony

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kenk View Post
              antny72...I've called several butcher block manufacturers, and they will make your drum whatever diameter, thickness, grain direction and material you want.
              Kenk also can you please provide a retailer you contacted that makes the 6 inch thick-24 round diameter Butcher Block. I was only able to find up to 4 inches on the round. Anything above 4 inches only came in square/rectangular dims at numerous places I've loooked into.
              -Anthony

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              • #8
                Quite option?

                http://www.gamespot.com/speed-bag-games-app/
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zaza View Post
                  LOL,this may really end up being my choice. I was also thinking of another too.
                  Attached Files
                  -Anthony

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Antny72 View Post
                    LOL,this may really end up being my choice. I was also thinking of another too.
                    I LOVE those things! Used to be really good with one as a kid.... now I have go find one.
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                    • #11
                      Something to consider on the end grain, splitting the wood when drilling into it for mounting I know it's all lamenated together but still drilling into end grain in general wood working is not ideal
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AtTheCross View Post
                        Something to consider on the end grain, splitting the wood when drilling into it for mounting I know it's all lamenated together but still drilling into end grain in general wood working is not ideal
                        Gee, i knew it looked to good to be true. These thick butcher blocks are so beautifiul, but the ones I looked into, anything over 2 /14 inches thick, only come in End grain. So I'm guessing the real problem may arise where the four holes of the swivel would be because they are so close together. I was actually wondering why I couldn't find any pictures of platforms made of these. I saw one with Mayweather and 50, that looked like a Butcher Block, but it was stained dark so I could of been anything glued together and built up to that thickness, and not an actuall endgrain butcher block. Hey, maybe just nobody has tried yet? If you have tried it or know of someone who has, please respond with results to this post!!!!!!!

                        Ok but I'm still not fully discourgaed from trying it as of "yet" Just the word NOT IDEAL, doesn't necessarilly discourage or change my mind from doing things.(Yes, it's gotten me into trouble in the past but has also allowed me to make progress in other areas as well) When you say ideal, can you elaborate on this further. What else if anything besides splitting can go wrong? And what would be the chances of that going wrong as well? Does any of this depend on the thickness of the endgrain? I'm thinking about 6 inches thick. Would drilling a very small hole and baby stepping up to necessary size, reduce that risk. Also, if I get past the point of the wood splitting from drilling and get the holes, are there any risks to consider after that point? What can result from this, after the bolts and supports are in the endgrain? On the flipside what if you drill the holes a little bigger than necessary then pour a thin coat of laquer down the holes to sort of coat the inside and keep things together??

                        Also Kenk had mentioned using a metal reinforced support plate. Would this added support plate stop or reduce the wood from splitting if added before drilling it?

                        I have no clue if any of this makes sense or will work, but just want to voice some thoughts and ideas around to be able to weigh all the risks and come to a better final decision.

                        Also, does anyone know of an EDGE grain instead of End grain cut block, with 24x24x6 or 24 diameter round and 6 inch thick dimensions available?
                        -Anthony

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                        • #13
                          Ok I finally found the video clip showing the what appears to be Butcher Block platforms. I took a snap shot too. These look solid but cant really tell waht they are made of, because of how dark they are. or even the thickness, I'm gauging around 5-6 inches? Any ideas?

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkTUu1YdYMQ
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by Bag-A-Holic; 12-31-2012, 02:20 PM.
                          -Anthony

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Antny72 View Post
                            Ok I finally found the video clip showing the what appears to be Butcher Block platforms. I took a snap shot too. These look solid but cant really tell waht they are made of because of how dark they are. Any ideas?

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkTUu1YdYMQ
                            Man... this sure seems like overkill to me. My 1917 Spaulding platform is the original 2" of Mahogany and solid as a rock. After a certain thickness, I tend to think it's more about the support and bracing then it is about the thickness. I don't have any extra weight on the top either.

                            I'd sure hate to have a 6" block drop on my head! It almost seems like it would bend the mounting brackets.

                            Building a 'quiet' platform is going to be a challenge...you might have to think in terms of a 'floating floor' system....like in high-end recording studios.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Zaza View Post
                              Man... this sure seems like overkill to me. My 1917 Spaulding platform is the original 2" of Mahogany and solid as a rock. After a certain thickness, I tend to think it's more about the support and bracing then it is about the thickness. I don't have any extra weight on the top either.

                              I'd sure hate to have a 6" block drop on my head! It almost seems like it would bend the mounting brackets.

                              Building a 'quiet' platform is going to be a challenge...you might have to think in terms of a 'floating floor' system....like in high-end recording studios.
                              We'll I had originally thought going with a solid maple 30 inch drum that was 1 3/4 thick, would be my answer, but this thing shook uncontrollable. I thought maybe the drum wasn't tight enough to the platform and tightened it up so much that the actuall washers on the bolts were getting sucked up into the second recessed holes on the platform. When I took it apart the washers weren't flat anymore, they were cupped into a U shape. I wish I took a video of this before I sent it back. Anyway maybe the mahoganey, or the old fashion designs holds up much better then the newer models? That old school Narransett platform looks like a solid set up as well. I just want to make sure my next purchase last more than two days.
                              -Anthony

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