bag size for 24" drum

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  • buckleybrent
    Speed Bag Trainee
    • Jul 2014
    • 3

    bag size for 24" drum

    Sorry if this is a question which has been asked and answered over and over again but I have to take the opportunity in my first post to ask what is the maximum bag size for a 24" drum. I need a bag for an existing 24" drum that I just picked up at a garage sale that had a deville swivel already on it. It sounds like 28" might have been the way to go if I was starting from scratch but this is what I've got to work with and it is only a bag away from being ready to hit.
  • Dutchman
    Speed Bag Historian
    • Jun 2006
    • 1903

    #2
    A 24" drum is going to limit you to a bag about 10" long including the loop. You should be able to accommodate up to a 10X7 bag but no larger. Anything bigger and the belly of the bag will start hitting the edge of the platform, which besides shortening the life of the bag affects it's performance.

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    • Speedbag
      Author of the Speed Bag Bible, founder of speedbagcentral.com

      • Feb 2006
      • 7107

      #3
      Originally posted by buckleybrent View Post
      Sorry if this is a question which has been asked and answered over and over again but I have to take the opportunity in my first post to ask what is the maximum bag size for a 24" drum. I need a bag for an existing 24" drum that I just picked up at a garage sale that had a deville swivel already on it. It sounds like 28" might have been the way to go if I was starting from scratch but this is what I've got to work with and it is only a bag away from being ready to hit.


      Here is a section about boards and bag size on Speedbagcentral.com

      It is a bit hard to size exactly what size will and won't work, because not all sizes are the same by brand. The other issue is bag shape. Some rounder, fatter speed bags have a lower "belly" (striking zone) than other narrow (banana shape) bags, which have more of a tapered bottom and the belly is a bit higher, toward the middle. Certainly Dutchman is right that to be safe, a 10x7 is about the maximum size. But you could use an 11x8 and get away with it. On my 24 inch board in that picture, I used that red Everlast 4210 a lot and it is 11x8. But the sheer size of that bag was a bit large for that board and there was always a lot of vibration if I felt like bagging it hard and fast.
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      • buckleybrent
        Speed Bag Trainee
        • Jul 2014
        • 3

        #4
        Thanks for the info. One follow up question. The drum while not bad could use a little beefing up. It is a single 3/4" piece of mdf with some 2x4's behind it. My plan would be, with budget in mind, to attach two more layers of 3/4" mdf to replace the 2x4's. As far as making this attachment I know thru reading that glue and bolts would be the preferred method, the thing I dont know is where to phyically place the bolts and how many I need. Would 4bolts located betweeen the swivel and where the belly of the bag hits the drum be enough? I would think locating bolts near the outside edge regardless of whether the heads were recessed or flat could impact the rebound and possibly damage the bag....Thoughts?

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        • Speedbag
          Author of the Speed Bag Bible, founder of speedbagcentral.com

          • Feb 2006
          • 7107

          #5
          Originally posted by buckleybrent View Post
          Thanks for the info. One follow up question. The drum while not bad could use a little beefing up. It is a single 3/4" piece of mdf with some 2x4's behind it. My plan would be, with budget in mind, to attach two more layers of 3/4" mdf to replace the 2x4's. As far as making this attachment I know thru reading that glue and bolts would be the preferred method, the thing I dont know is where to phyically place the bolts and how many I need. Would 4bolts located betweeen the swivel and where the belly of the bag hits the drum be enough? I would think locating bolts near the outside edge regardless of whether the heads were recessed or flat could impact the rebound and possibly damage the bag....Thoughts?
          I would suggest that before you go modifying your board with more holes and all I would first add some material weight on top. I don't think another 3/4 inch board on top will buffer the repetitive smacking of a bag as much as 20-30 pounds of sand, or similar soft material you can lay over the top. Many have put a few sand bags over a thin board and added a lot of stability. And if you ceiling above can stand it, you could cut one or two 2x4's to wedge over the board to the ceiling, adding a bit of downward pressure/support on the board to reduce vibration. But not every ceiling can allow that.

          I have seen a bunch of units with flat head or recessed bolts on board that fell within the rebound area of a bag. remember, the rebound area changes with the bag size. Your bolts may be well inside the bag contact area of an 11x8, but right on the belly of a 7x4 bag, so it's hard to pick a distance that won't eventually come into play if you use a variety of bag sizes.

          Hope this helps.

          Speed Bag

          Put a little Rhythm in YOUR workout!
          *attendee: Every SB gathering so far!
          The Quest Continues...
          Hoping for another Gathering...


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          • buckleybrent
            Speed Bag Trainee
            • Jul 2014
            • 3

            #6
            I will try the sand/weight first. As far as attachment into the mdf whether it is attaching into the ceiling structure or attaching multiple plys of mdf together what are my best options? Screws can be challenging from what I read as the tendency seems to be for the screws to loosen over time. How about bolts? Would I need to worry about the square plug of a carriage bolt loosening or stripping out the inner fibers of the mdf while tightning? Can you even pound the inner square head of a carriage bolt into mdf? Is there another type of bolt I should be considering?

            Thanks,

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            • Speedbag
              Author of the Speed Bag Bible, founder of speedbagcentral.com

              • Feb 2006
              • 7107

              #7
              Originally posted by buckleybrent View Post
              I will try the sand/weight first. As far as attachment into the mdf whether it is attaching into the ceiling structure or attaching multiple plys of mdf together what are my best options? Screws can be challenging from what I read as the tendency seems to be for the screws to loosen over time. How about bolts? Would I need to worry about the square plug of a carriage bolt loosening or stripping out the inner fibers of the mdf while tightning? Can you even pound the inner square head of a carriage bolt into mdf? Is there another type of bolt I should be considering?

              Thanks,
              The answer probably depends on the exact area you are talking about and materials at hand. I Personally I would almost always chose bolts over screws for they are easier to replace.
              Speed Bag

              Put a little Rhythm in YOUR workout!
              *attendee: Every SB gathering so far!
              The Quest Continues...
              Hoping for another Gathering...


              sigpic

              The Art of the Bag

              Comment

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