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  • Sb for beginners

    https://youtu.be/oH7NvrjhtCI

  • #2
    Nice to see you back on the forum, Justin

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    • #3
      Always great to see and hear Bag Master Juxt back under the board. ( hey juxt: get that place a ballhhok swivel...)
      Speed Bag

      Put a little Rhythm in YOUR workout!
      *attendee: Every SB gathering so far!
      The Quest Continues...
      Hoping for another Gathering...


      sigpic

      The Art of the Bag

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      • #4
        Hi I was wondering if anybody out there lives around would-be Island or is slightly text savvy to maybe do some video chatting to help me with my form when I get started on this new endeavor, I’m 100% completely blind before I was blind I played football wrestling and baseball after I became blind I did Brazilians s jujitsu for some years I had a great time with it got my blue belt competed it was a lot of fun but now I’m a stay at home dad looking for my next physical endeavor and being completely blind I heard what you guys were doing on the speed bags and it sounds awesome! Got some pretty good equipment on the way and I’m excited to dive into this but was hoping to get a few pointers at the beginning really just don’t wanna develop bad habits so I’m gonna have to fix later had some of that happened in Jujitsu and it’s way harder to fix bad habits than it is to just take the time to learn them right which I’m sure you guys can concur with LOL thanks for your time have a great day!

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        • #5
          Welcome Savage Magoo I'm sure there are many here who can help you. First I want you to know this is from my prospective only. You couldn't have picked a better sport, much of my own training has included closing my eyes so I can hear the rhythm of the bag and have found it even more important than visual. You have to remember the brain is trying to develop muscle memoir and the rhythm is a beautiful way to connect to the strike. I have no expertise in helping the blind but I do think your going to love it and don't forget we all get frustrated from time to time if it was easy it wouldn't be any fun. One other thing that I think is important, I also truly believe that this is an especially great sport for the blind ........ and to just answer that question in you thoughts (am I going to get hit in the noise) yes, well all do. Hope this is of some help and now that your part of the family please keep us posted. ENJOY

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Savage Magoo View Post
            Hi I was wondering if anybody out there lives around would-be Island or is slightly text savvy to maybe do some video chatting to help me with my form when I get started on this new endeavor, I’m 100% completely blind before I was blind I played football wrestling and baseball after I became blind I did Brazilians s jujitsu for some years I had a great time with it got my blue belt competed it was a lot of fun but now I’m a stay at home dad looking for my next physical endeavor and being completely blind I heard what you guys were doing on the speed bags and it sounds awesome! Got some pretty good equipment on the way and I’m excited to dive into this but was hoping to get a few pointers at the beginning really just don’t wanna develop bad habits so I’m gonna have to fix later had some of that happened in Jujitsu and it’s way harder to fix bad habits than it is to just take the time to learn them right which I’m sure you guys can concur with LOL thanks for your time have a great day!
            Very inspirational. I 2nd everything that dad said. It's amazing how helpful the sound patterns are to learning new combinations. As for instruction Mr Kahns' videos are probably your best bet. I think you made a great decision to pick up a speed bag and are going to have a lot of fun figuring it out. Good luck Magoo

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            • #7
              Pete's right Mr. Kahn would be the best way to go and I'm sure he has some great insight into blind bagging and baggers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Savage Magoo View Post
                Hi I was wondering if anybody out there lives around would-be Island or is slightly text savvy to maybe do some video chatting to help me with my form when I get started on this new endeavor, I’m 100% completely blind before I was blind I played football wrestling and baseball after I became blind I did Brazilians s jujitsu for some years I had a great time with it got my blue belt competed it was a lot of fun but now I’m a stay at home dad looking for my next physical endeavor and being completely blind I heard what you guys were doing on the speed bags and it sounds awesome! Got some pretty good equipment on the way and I’m excited to dive into this but was hoping to get a few pointers at the beginning really just don’t wanna develop bad habits so I’m gonna have to fix later had some of that happened in Jujitsu and it’s way harder to fix bad habits than it is to just take the time to learn them right which I’m sure you guys can concur with LOL thanks for your time have a great day!
                Hey Savage Magoo. Welcome to the forum. The Speed Bag is very unique in that it adapts to everybody with any challenge, physical or mental disability. It's a very forgiving equipment and it is hard to find a "Wrong Way" to hit it, just more efficient ways. I wouldn't worry about "form" so much at first, letting the sound be your guide. The speed bag usually adapts pretty easy to "bad form" and if your "punching form" get too far off that you cannot keep the bag going, well... that bag and it's sound will tell you. Particularly in your situation, as you cannot "see your form" as your punching or video yourself from the side to watch it back, which I think is the best way.... - So I would say it will be very important for you to have a sighted helper that is basically knowledgeable about the basics of the speed bag. If only to watch and try to see what may be causing an issue - for instance - if you fist is hitting slightly "late" in a rebound, and the fist-bag contact point is too low on the bag, the resultant rebound will make a poor rebound and bad sound (chanking if a ball hook swivel) - But several reasons could cause that and if you cannot see that you hit too low and late in a rebound you might not know that is the problem. Once you get the basics down with some control a sighted guide might not be so important, but for trying to advance through various levels of complexity, it will certainly help to have some assistance.

                That said, the speed bag is and Auditory instrument, and utilizes mostly auditory control. the eyes do play a part for seeing rebound angles or fist contact, but as far as repetitive punching control, it is ALL ears, so your fine there. Many of our top baggers put on demonstrations blind folded and still demonstrate amazing skill, speed and control. BUT .... they did not learn blind. That is it's own challenge but not insurmountable, just requiring a bit more insight and understanding in the teaching process. Hence, the importance of a least a willing sighted guide to help.

                In a previous career, as a Recreation Therapist for the Department of Veteran Affairs, back in a 1983 - 1987 I was assigned to our 20 bed Blind Rehabilitation Clinical program in Waco Texas https://www.centraltexas.va.gov/serv...bilitation.asp

                I had to take the week long "sighted guide" training course, and implement those skills through recreation activities within the hospital setting and surrounding community. I worked with many veterans with extremely low vision, or that were totally blind. We did all kinds of active and passive recreation activities and taught them how to (1) do the activity or (2) adapt to the environment of an activity. For instance, we would teach the skill/activity of bowling - and we had blind veterans on our VA bowling team. We also taught them, and their "sighted guide" family member, how to manage restaurants, movie theatres, stadium activities (football, baseball etc) and travers those environment with the minimal interference. We taught them to navigate walking side walks, crossing streets and managing busy intersections. We had some amazing blind veteran instructors that could regularly navigate busy streets and teach the "secrets of sound" and how to actually interpret different sounds in the environment to help you manage those situations. Of all my 30 years working in the VA, I most enjoyed that assignment. And our medical center did have speed bags. Not in the recreation program, but as part of the Kinesiotherapy clinics. They had the punching bags, heavy, speed and double end. When the Blind clinic veterans went to the Kinesiotherapy clinic, twice per week, I would go with them. Nobody on the Kinesiotherapy staff knew jack about a speed bag, but fortunately they did let me assist. I was able to work with veterans, both low vision and totally blind, to work with the speed bag. So - that did teach me a little of how to adapt the bag for that population. Since the clinic (remember this is 1983 - 1987) had the larger, more robust speed bags, like 11x14, and big heavy 36 inch boards, those bags hit heavy and slow. the biggest problem for the blind was the rebound area in front of their face, and how NOT to get hit by the bag coming back at them.. Most of the vets had memory of least of seeing a speed bag in boxing and knowing how it looked, so they knew the bag would come flying back to their face. Now for those that don't know, people who are blind tend to "rock" forward-back or side-to-side a bit jus a bit to hold their balance. It is VERY hard to stand or sit straight with your eyes close, and the tendency to "rock" helps hold body position, and sometimes that forward rocking brought the head into the rebound area... which can create fear in the individual when they get hit by the bag - SO, we adapted that by wearing an old fashion football helmet with the single bar across the face. With that, IF the punching motions or rocking brought the head to close to the rebound arc it would hit the bar or helmet, now the face. With time and practice, many adapted to hitting the bag in the basic triplet rhythm (hitting from the front) without the helmet. I was also get a smaller few to do a pretty good front fist rolling combination, however stepping back out of the rolling motion does have a distance factor that is a bit trickier to learn, but most eventually learned. I never did get to spend a lot of "private time" with any individual back then, as it was a group session and only an hour or so long. I always did want to spend a lot more time working with Blind on the speed bag for my own education on how to teach it and what adaptions were needed for reverse punching, elbow strikes and other moves - but this was Before My years writing the Speed Bag Bible. I started that (making notes) in late 1987, and speed bag was not my main focus during time since I was 4 to 5 nights per week in Hapkido training.

                Anyway, it will be very interesting to work with and help you progress on the speed bag. I see no reason why you cannot master the bag to a high level of skill, especially with some help sighted guide assistance. I'm sure we have many baggers that would be honored to help you, as would I. It will be an amazing experience for us all.
                Speed Bag

                Put a little Rhythm in YOUR workout!
                *attendee: Every SB gathering so far!
                The Quest Continues...
                Hoping for another Gathering...


                sigpic

                The Art of the Bag

                Comment

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