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Boxer vs Brawler

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  • Boxer vs Brawler

    In my experience boxing, I have come to a conclusion that fan enthusiasts have lost, or replaced the true definition to the word boxing. There is a short definition thats easy to remember, hit and don't be hit, thats boxing from my perspective. In today's world of boxing, fight fans seem to love the fighter who is willing to get into wild exchanges with any fighter. Yeah sure, I can understand the entertainment value in such a match, but the purist in me won't allow that type of fighting style to sway my opinion about what boxing truly is.

    Boxer vs Brawler debates are very prevalent in the boxing circles I'm in and I seem to get a higher percentage of fight fans who lean towards brawlers as better fighters. I often ask myself why this is. The key in life is balance, boxing also follows the same credo. In my opinion a boxer should embody this theory blending just the right amount of offensive with superb defense. Overly aggressive fighters usually don't have longjevity. A good boxer can fight as long as his heart and his body mechanics allow him to.

    I'm interested in how others feel on this subject. Feel free to share your thoughts.
    Your mind will quit before your body will
    Train your mind twice as hard as you train your body
    And you will be a force to be reckoned with

    Personal quote by:
    SirMalikCobra
    sigpic

  • #2
    I dropped the "queens" rules in 1979 and never looked back. I agree there are some brawlers out there but full contact sparring is as much defense. Sensitivity and distance to the target as boxing. Just with a whole lot more options. Just as understanding boxing allows you to watch the technical game understanding MMA or JKD also allows for the viewing of technical expertise of the game.
    sgt
    USMC 79-85


    Thanks to all who continue to serve... and to those that answered the call in the past!

    Comment


    • #3
      That's interesting. In your opinion what makes brawlers effective? Anyone can feel free to answer this one.
      Your mind will quit before your body will
      Train your mind twice as hard as you train your body
      And you will be a force to be reckoned with

      Personal quote by:
      SirMalikCobra
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Not a straight "fling the hands every which way" brawler. But someone trained to fight in multiple method fighting will look to a person not familiar with the wing chun method as out of control because of the amount of moves per second. When, like bible bagging, is actually an efficient use of combinations coming together for maximum effectiveness on the target.
        Last edited by bbally; 01-24-2013, 07:26 PM.
        sgt
        USMC 79-85


        Thanks to all who continue to serve... and to those that answered the call in the past!

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh, I see. I had this conversation with a gym mate of mine. He said, how do you fight a guy who is relentless and has speed and stamina. I have not studied Wing Chun but I do know that the system strings multiple punches together to effectively overbear an opponent. My answer to his question was defensive rhythm. When fighters throw punches each punch has its own rhythm. The key is to learn how to catch or intercept the punches in rhythm.

          This is not an easy task but Ezzard Charles, Sugar Ray Robbinson, and Floyd Mayweather, are masters of defensive rhythm. It's the same theory with the speed bag. In order to keep the bag rebounding steady you must punch in some sort of rhythm. Therefore, if offensive rhythm is present, defensive rhythm is the best method of countering any offensive tempo. Once you get your opponents timing down, you must strike in between the punches you have intercepted. This skill is not achieved overnight. Pure god giving speed alone is not enough, you must have a solid defensive foundation and build from there.

          In addition, if you go do your research on James Toney, and Emmanuel Agustus this is the epitome of defensive tempo.
          Last edited by SirMalikCobra; 01-24-2013, 10:45 PM. Reason: Typo...
          Your mind will quit before your body will
          Train your mind twice as hard as you train your body
          And you will be a force to be reckoned with

          Personal quote by:
          SirMalikCobra
          sigpic

          Comment


          • #6
            I am thinking maybe you are talking about an untrained fighter against a boxer? The arm flailing person that does not really know how to fight?

            Because for the trained MMA or JKD fighter the defensive also has its rhythm.

            Just as a for instance as the jab is coming in sharp and fast to probe and/or try to land through an opening. The trained fighter (not using the Queen's Rules) is going to switch from Gui Jee (finger jabbing) to Pak Sau (slapping palm block) this only takes a roll of the arm to go from offense to defense.

            In wing chun is it a count of 1 2 3 only in a triplet speed. (that is why the speed bag is such a good fit for those of us practice this form of fighting.) You may switch from offense to defense in the middle of the triplet count depending on how your opponent is trained and at what level. You may also move from grappling distance to boxing distance to leg distance and back during the strikes and parries'.

            I agree with you that a failing untrained fighter is fairly easy to beat. In fact most times they beat themselves with just a little aid from the opponent.

            My point is that some high level fighting forms can be confused with a brawling untrained fighter simply due to the lack of education of the observer.
            sgt
            USMC 79-85


            Thanks to all who continue to serve... and to those that answered the call in the past!

            Comment


            • #7
              I see your point. Let me give you an example. For instance Manny Aka Pacman. He's a trained fighter. However, he is a brawler. When he fights people who fight that brawler style he does well, however, when he is up against a boxer of the same skill level that aggression does not help him all that much. That aggression actually allows a lot of openings to punch through, in our gym we call it the (window of opportunity). My point is efficiency over quantity. Actual, I understand what your saying in regards to JKD and Wing Chun but unfortunately I have not seen that applied yet in regards to traditional boxing with gloves on. Trust me, it's a bit different.
              Your mind will quit before your body will
              Train your mind twice as hard as you train your body
              And you will be a force to be reckoned with

              Personal quote by:
              SirMalikCobra
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Just a quick two pointer:
                1. I definitely think that if you're a brawler with power and a great chin, you should always play to your strengths.
                2. It's good to have different styles of boxing. Keeps the fights from getting stale.

                You mentioned that boxers do have longevity over brawlers, and while I believe that it's true, it obviously isn't something you contemplate a lot as a brawler. Also, just to point out, boxing at the highest level isn't a sport with longevity in the first place.

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