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Hardest heart pump workout on bag

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  • dsmith2296
    replied
    Punching in triplet rythym, R - FSP, R - FCP, L - FSP, L- FCP is pretty easy walking 3.8 mph on a treadmill. I counted every R - FSP for a minute and I have 31 per minute which I believe equates to around 120 total strikes per minute. If that lets you know how fast I go.- Steady, but nothing too fancy.

    No way could I keep anything fancy like double punch, triple punch, reverse punch or fist rolling going very smoothly while walking on a treadmill. Actually, I can't even reverse punch standing still yet.

    I actually watch Lou Dobbs on CNN every night at 7:00 pm when I do my mile hitting the bag and I can watch TV and hit the bag with my peripheral vision most of the 16 minutes. Its a relatively light workout- maxing my heart rate out at around 150 bpm. As I said, walking only had me around 125 bpm. But if I run a 10 minute mile on 6.1 mph, I get up to 170 bpm.

    I am 36, 5' 10", 180 lbs.
    Last edited by dsmith2296; 01-31-2008, 08:48 AM.

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  • atgatt
    replied
    Post # 108.

    Speedbag, that's nothing. I can jump rope and hit the bag at the same time.

    What looked like even more of a workout in your film was you bringing down your platform and wheeling in that bike.

    The steps along with the bag does look like killer.

    It's all for our good though just after reading this study today:

    http://www.nysun.com/article/70339

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  • Speedbag
    replied
    Originally posted by atgatt View Post
    Not to keep this thread going on forever, but I can't shut up just yet.

    dsmith, how old are you? I've seen Speedbag hit the bag while riding a stationary bike, but at least the seat keeps him level and somewhat braced to the chair. You are walking and hitting. Is that easy to do? Do you see a difference in heart rate with leg work vs arm work?

    ...My guess they are reaching 180/200. What's your guesses?
    Talk about changing levels while punching, check out the opening 18 seconds of this video. I call it Step & Punch, and trust me - it will get your heart rate up to 180/200. Way harder than Punching and Riding.

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  • atgatt
    replied
    Not to keep this thread going on forever, but I can't shut up just yet.

    dsmith, how old are you? I've seen Speedbag hit the bag while riding a stationary bike, but at least the seat keeps him level and somewhat braced to the chair. You are walking and hitting. Is that easy to do? Do you see a difference in heart rate with leg work vs arm work?

    Tim, now you got me thinking about getting some 16 oz gloves too for the DE bag. I don't know why because every week I do work road trips on my motorcycle and for the four hour ride today, my right shoulder was stiff from all the hitting I did previously. Still, I want to try those gloves.

    With more training, I want to see if I could get into the 180 rate like you did and not go flat line afterwards. Sounds like you did some serious training not long ago. You-da-man.

    It would be interesting if boxers had heart monitors to show their rates throughout the fight. My guess they are reaching 180/200. What's your guesses?

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  • Tim
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim View Post
    I'm working out tonite... I'll give it a go.

    Speed bag - I was wailing on my 10x7, the most heart rate I could get was about 170-171. I didn't have time to put up a smaller bag, but the bigger bags feel like more of a workout to me.

    I setup my double end bag and worked it with some 16 oz gloves, lots of combos, bob and weave and keeping in motion (at least for a 180 degree arc - that's all I have room for). Within 2 rounds I was up to 188-189. My monitor has an alarm when you hit max heart rate, so I know when to check it.

    My heavy bag (the one I actually hit and not the one that weighs down the board) is up in the attic. I'm sure I can go 190+ with that...

    I used to do a pretty serious boxing workout (2yrs ago)- Heavy Bag x 6 rounds, DE bag x 4-5 rounds, speed bag - at least 6 rounds. I'm sure I regularly went way over 185 heart rate on those workouts.

    Several years ago I ran a 5K ... and was woefully unprepared. I finished it, but I felt like I was going to die by the end. the last 1K or so was sheer torture. My heart was pounding out of my chest and was breathing hard in a way I'd never experienced up until then or ever since. I'd love to know what my heart rate was for that, not that I'd ever do anything that foolish again.
    Last edited by Tim; 01-28-2008, 08:18 PM.

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  • Tim
    replied
    Originally posted by atgatt View Post
    Have you ever gone beyond your max of 185? Not sustained, but just a peak, like just after doing a flurry for how ever long you can push it, then checking your rate immediately.

    Just don't go and have a heart attack on us and the same for me.
    I'm working out tonite... I'll give it a go.

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  • dsmith2296
    replied
    One mile at 6.1 mph for 10 minutes = 172 bpm

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  • atgatt
    replied
    Tim, I'm curious. You have a 185 max limit you said. The watch is bothering when hitting certain ways.

    My max is 165 but I can go beyond it either by going all out on the speedbag towards the later part of the workout, or doing the same on the double end bag.

    I think if I were to see what is the highest I can get it, it would be from the double end by only hitting it; no blocking, weaving, etc. My guess is that I'm swinging by at least half the cadence of the speedbag, but the reach is farther and much more unpredictable. It's taking a lot more body movement and concentration.

    Have you ever gone beyond your max of 185? Not sustained, but just a peak, like just after doing a flurry for how ever long you can push it, then checking your rate immediately.

    Just don't go and have a heart attack on us and the same for me.

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  • Tim
    replied
    Originally posted by atgatt View Post
    If anything, the heart monitor adds to the fun of a workout.
    Yes, it's fascinating to check out the heart rates, isn't it? I try to use mine as much as possible now. It also gives quantitative feedback so you can push yourself harder, if I'm walking and I'm < 60% I know I need to start going faster...

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  • atgatt
    replied
    It is interesting how our heart rates are similar between us all in this thread.

    Roughly around 120 hitting the bag and then walking.

    Today while hitting, it follows a pattern similar to yours, dsmith, by the rate starting low, settling at about 120, and about 15 minutes later hitting at the same rate the rate is a bit higher.

    Going all out on the speedbag though, especially the 8 x 5, got my rate over 170 today again.

    Also today I put up a new Title small double end bag with very loose cords. I tried a new thing of just swinging left and right repeatedly at it and always making a hit with each punch. No blocking, ducking or weaving; just hitting wherever it is. THAT got me over 175 beats.

    If anything, the heart monitor adds to the fun of a workout.

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  • dsmith2296
    replied
    Heart Rate

    Well I got a Polar heart rate monitor. My speed bag overhangs my treadmill. Every night I do a mile on the treadmill on 3.8 miles per hour while hitting the bag in standard triplet rythym making two strikes per second or 120 strikes per minute. It takes me 16 minutes to go one mile.

    At the 5 minute mark, I was at 135 bpm. At 10 minutes, I was at 140 bpm and at 16 minutes I was at 150 bpm.

    When I just walked without hitting the bag, I was at 120 bpm at both 5 min and 10 min, then 125 bpm at 16 minute mark.

    When I hit only, 115 bpm. When I fist rolled, my triceps gave out before my heart.
    Last edited by dsmith2296; 01-25-2008, 07:16 PM. Reason: making changes

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  • roberthelpus
    replied
    I think that I am going to basically ignore the whole heart rate thing as well. Other than the recovery function on my stationary bike.

    When my father was hooked up to monitors in the hospital with pnuemonia a few times is resting heart rate went down into the thirties. Years before that they had him on the treadmill for a stress test with two nurses hanging on him in an attempt to reach a target heart rate. He thought that they were trying to kill him.

    So guessing that I may have inherited his genes in this regard I don't think that I will pay too much attention to the expectations. I've definitely felt that I was putting out some considerable effort while my heart rate was nowhere near the targets for my age bracket.

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  • speedbag4life
    replied
    Originally posted by atgatt View Post
    As with so many things, I'm reading and finding that the max heart rate formula that is 220 - your age, is bogus. I'll have to read more on the subject though.

    My concern grew when hitting the various bags today, I was able to get my rate beyond 170 and my monitor started to beep at 166 and beyond since I programmed it for being my max and warning.

    Even in the 170s, although I was winded, I didn't feel I was at my max and would like to push it more sometime.

    I just wonder if it is dangerous.

    Anyone have any knowledge on this?
    No scientific/studied knowledge, but anecdotal. Having scoffed the max heart rate formula for years, I agree that there's something relatively bogus about it. Listening to your body is a better gauge than using a little math formula. That said, the formula isn't entirely without merit. A ball-park estimate is a good start.

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  • atgatt
    replied
    jaguiler,

    Thanks. I'll have to take more time to read the attachments from the other responses to you.

    Like you, I'm in the 120/130 range when hitting the speedbag, but going hard at it, slight rest, hard at it, etc. I can reach the 160s.

    Same with the double end bag. Hitting, ducking, weaving, blocking puts me in the 130s. but really going at the double end, puts me in the 160s.

    Really pushing the speedbag can get me just over the 170 range briefly and not have a heart attack, yet.

    What is your resting rate? That is when you are very rested and still laying down. Mine is in the low 60s. Someday I plan on going lower to a flat line.

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  • jaguiler
    replied
    Talking about HRM's here is some research I did with my heart rate monitor -

    http://www.speedbagforum.com/forums/...read.php?t=299

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